GSR Wearable

I have been experimenting with ways to add a quantitative dimension to my thesis question. I decided to build a wearable that could measure a person's Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and send the data to my phone, as well as upload it to a cloud. GSR can approximate a person's arousal state. The idea is that I would walk around different parts of an environment with a user, while the user has my wearable on, and I could correlate physical features with physical arousal state. This would tell me what physical features evoke positive and negative feelings.

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Although the wearable "works," it doesn't do the job I was hoping it would do. GSR data is not a very clean dataset to begin with, and it also doesn't quite tell a person's state quite well, as sweat can influence its values a lot.

Source: https://sara-camnasio-pfyd.squarespace.com...

Non-verbal Communication

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While traveling to New Orleans and Philadelphia, I started noticing non-verbal communication examples. It all started from the chair with the rope, which I saw at a former plantation in the countryside of Louisiana. It made me wonder: what are the benefits of non-verbal communication, if any? Is it calming? Is it less intimidating? Does it make our lives easier? I feel like non-verbal communication, if effective, is like good UX design: we don't notice it. So I guess I'm just trying to give a shoutout to this medium of communication that I think is under-appreciated.

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